robertvaladez:

Feliz Cumpleaños MARIA FELIX! LA CHINGONA…100 YEARS This day….Drawing by Robert Valadez.

(via lachicanarosie)

hellray:

The Art Journal The Industry of All Nations Illustrated Catalogue (London, England: Bradbury and Evans, 1851)
hellray:

The Art Journal The Industry of All Nations Illustrated Catalogue (London, England: Bradbury and Evans, 1851)
hellray:

The Art Journal The Industry of All Nations Illustrated Catalogue (London, England: Bradbury and Evans, 1851)
hellray:

The Art Journal The Industry of All Nations Illustrated Catalogue (London, England: Bradbury and Evans, 1851)

hellray:

The Art Journal The Industry of All Nations Illustrated Catalogue (London, England: Bradbury and Evans, 1851)

(via vimandvigour)

another-echo-chamber:

TEEN ANGELES magazine - cholo and chicano culture from california and the rest of the u.s.
i was tempted to post the “chola bands” by themselves, but this magazine had all kinds of great shit in it.
another-echo-chamber:

TEEN ANGELES magazine - cholo and chicano culture from california and the rest of the u.s.
i was tempted to post the “chola bands” by themselves, but this magazine had all kinds of great shit in it.
another-echo-chamber:

TEEN ANGELES magazine - cholo and chicano culture from california and the rest of the u.s.
i was tempted to post the “chola bands” by themselves, but this magazine had all kinds of great shit in it.
another-echo-chamber:

TEEN ANGELES magazine - cholo and chicano culture from california and the rest of the u.s.
i was tempted to post the “chola bands” by themselves, but this magazine had all kinds of great shit in it.
another-echo-chamber:

TEEN ANGELES magazine - cholo and chicano culture from california and the rest of the u.s.
i was tempted to post the “chola bands” by themselves, but this magazine had all kinds of great shit in it.
another-echo-chamber:

TEEN ANGELES magazine - cholo and chicano culture from california and the rest of the u.s.
i was tempted to post the “chola bands” by themselves, but this magazine had all kinds of great shit in it.

another-echo-chamber:

TEEN ANGELES magazine - cholo and chicano culture from california and the rest of the u.s.

i was tempted to post the “chola bands” by themselves, but this magazine had all kinds of great shit in it.

(via lachicanarosie)

melloncolliesinfinitemixtape:

Bauhaus / She’s in Parties

the graveyard scene, the golden years

(via hey-death)

tolteka:

 Xochipilli represents the concept of enlightened understanding.The best way to do this is through study and observation, in the scientific tradition of our ancestors. Xochipilli is associated with flowers which is a metaphor for poetry, where truth and big ideas are summarized in words and song.  The art of poetry was the highest art form in Mexico Tenochtitlan and all over Anahuac.
Poetry was not just spoken, it was sung.
The idea was that “art made things divine”, and only the divine was true.
There were different kinds of poems, like war songs, moral, and philosophical works.
Nezahualcoyotl (“Fasting Coyote”) of Texcoco is considered a pre-eminent poet-ruler of the 15th century. One of his most famous works describes life as temporary - and beautiful - as flowers.
The theme of “flowers” was regularly used: to symbolize the temporary fragility and beauty of existence.
The poet Cuacuahtzin used this theme of flowers: “I crave flowers that will not perish in my hands! / Where might I find lovely flowers, lovely songs? / Such as I seek, Spring does not produce on earth;”
The Nahuatl expression for poetry was in xochitl, in cuicuatl (“flowers and song”).
tolteka:

 Xochipilli represents the concept of enlightened understanding.The best way to do this is through study and observation, in the scientific tradition of our ancestors. Xochipilli is associated with flowers which is a metaphor for poetry, where truth and big ideas are summarized in words and song.  The art of poetry was the highest art form in Mexico Tenochtitlan and all over Anahuac.
Poetry was not just spoken, it was sung.
The idea was that “art made things divine”, and only the divine was true.
There were different kinds of poems, like war songs, moral, and philosophical works.
Nezahualcoyotl (“Fasting Coyote”) of Texcoco is considered a pre-eminent poet-ruler of the 15th century. One of his most famous works describes life as temporary - and beautiful - as flowers.
The theme of “flowers” was regularly used: to symbolize the temporary fragility and beauty of existence.
The poet Cuacuahtzin used this theme of flowers: “I crave flowers that will not perish in my hands! / Where might I find lovely flowers, lovely songs? / Such as I seek, Spring does not produce on earth;”
The Nahuatl expression for poetry was in xochitl, in cuicuatl (“flowers and song”).
tolteka:

 Xochipilli represents the concept of enlightened understanding.The best way to do this is through study and observation, in the scientific tradition of our ancestors. Xochipilli is associated with flowers which is a metaphor for poetry, where truth and big ideas are summarized in words and song.  The art of poetry was the highest art form in Mexico Tenochtitlan and all over Anahuac.
Poetry was not just spoken, it was sung.
The idea was that “art made things divine”, and only the divine was true.
There were different kinds of poems, like war songs, moral, and philosophical works.
Nezahualcoyotl (“Fasting Coyote”) of Texcoco is considered a pre-eminent poet-ruler of the 15th century. One of his most famous works describes life as temporary - and beautiful - as flowers.
The theme of “flowers” was regularly used: to symbolize the temporary fragility and beauty of existence.
The poet Cuacuahtzin used this theme of flowers: “I crave flowers that will not perish in my hands! / Where might I find lovely flowers, lovely songs? / Such as I seek, Spring does not produce on earth;”
The Nahuatl expression for poetry was in xochitl, in cuicuatl (“flowers and song”).
tolteka:

 Xochipilli represents the concept of enlightened understanding.The best way to do this is through study and observation, in the scientific tradition of our ancestors. Xochipilli is associated with flowers which is a metaphor for poetry, where truth and big ideas are summarized in words and song.  The art of poetry was the highest art form in Mexico Tenochtitlan and all over Anahuac.
Poetry was not just spoken, it was sung.
The idea was that “art made things divine”, and only the divine was true.
There were different kinds of poems, like war songs, moral, and philosophical works.
Nezahualcoyotl (“Fasting Coyote”) of Texcoco is considered a pre-eminent poet-ruler of the 15th century. One of his most famous works describes life as temporary - and beautiful - as flowers.
The theme of “flowers” was regularly used: to symbolize the temporary fragility and beauty of existence.
The poet Cuacuahtzin used this theme of flowers: “I crave flowers that will not perish in my hands! / Where might I find lovely flowers, lovely songs? / Such as I seek, Spring does not produce on earth;”
The Nahuatl expression for poetry was in xochitl, in cuicuatl (“flowers and song”).

tolteka:


Xochipilli represents the concept of enlightened understanding.The best way to do this is through study and observation, in the scientific tradition of our ancestors. Xochipilli is associated with flowers which is a metaphor for poetry, where truth and big ideas are summarized in words and song.  The art of poetry was the highest art form in Mexico Tenochtitlan and all over Anahuac.

Poetry was not just spoken, it was sung.

The idea was that “art made things divine”, and only the divine was true.

There were different kinds of poems, like war songs, moral, and philosophical works.

Nezahualcoyotl (“Fasting Coyote”) of Texcoco is considered a pre-eminent poet-ruler of the 15th century. One of his most famous works describes life as temporary - and beautiful - as flowers.

The theme of “flowers” was regularly used: to symbolize the temporary fragility and beauty of existence.

The poet Cuacuahtzin used this theme of flowers: “I crave flowers that will not perish in my hands! / Where might I find lovely flowers, lovely songs? / Such as I seek, Spring does not produce on earth;”

The Nahuatl expression for poetry was in xochitl, in cuicuatl (“flowers and song”).

(via lachicanarosie)

a-la-maquina:

One of my favorite flickas EVER!!

XICANA POWER!! 

(via lachicanarosie)

“A woman can hide her love for 40 years, but her disgust and anger not for one day.”
— Arab Proverb  (via mxkkkhxxlx)

(via lachicanarosie)